Archive for the ‘style and planning’ category

Choosing core pattern blocks

May 22, 2022

How to choose a small basic set of patterns to use as the starting point for your hacking adventures ?

I’m surprised that I have at last got my own group of core patterns. I recognise that I have got to this point because I now feel relaxed about it. It must have been a concern for years, as I’ve written many posts about it, which I’ve pulled together here. I have written so much on this, it’s obviously not a topic for which there is an instant, or single, solution.

There are three main sections of this post :
– my own core patterns, as an example.
– I wrote many past posts about the possible choice of a small group of patterns to make a capsule, which I have brought together here.
– as most of those posts are a decade old the pattern links no longer work, so I have added links to some current indie pattern companies which offer stylish casual patterns.

– – –

My own core patterns

As in most aspects of sewing, there are so many pattern choices it can rapidly get overwhelming. So it’s well worth being secure about your own style, the clothes that you love to wear. Notice what it is that you always reach for, or that you regret being in the laundry.

The best patterns to use as a base for pattern hacking are very simple, they have few or no style elements. Those elements are added by the pattern hacking.

The following posts are about my own core patterns, the basic shapes I need for ‘stylish casuals’ :
cut-on sleeve top,
drop shoulder casual sleeved top (also basis for shirts),
on-shoulder casual sleeved top,
basic slim leg pants fit (scroll down).
I also have a well-fitting pattern for a raglan sleeve top, though that’s not a key shape for me, I need more shoulder definition.

The pullover tops can all easily be developed to other garment types :
– open the front : here’s my series of posts on doing that.
– enlarge to a layering jacket/ vest/ coat : I refer to Don McCunn p.154.

All the tops can very easily be lengthened into simple dresses (basically just extend the side seams, some notes on this process from Paper Theory).

I also have core patterns for, but rarely use as I’m not a dress and skirt wearer :
– fitted bodice,
– pencil skirt,
– a-line skirt (without darts).
If I was a dress wearer with a more average body shape I would also have a core :
– sheath dress (fitted dress without a waist seam),
but my small busted wide hipped body would just look silly in such a style.

Once your core patterns are developed to fit well, then you can look at the pattern companies for style element ideas 😀 to add to the basics by pattern hacking (see the first post in this pair).

– – –

Past posts on small groups of patterns
I’ve written many posts which suggest a group of patterns for a core wardrobe. They were originally written as comments on wardrobe planning, so don’t include much guidance on hacking them to make different styles, such as :
Pattern books for wardrobe building
A core wardrobe from Sew Over It patterns

A wardrobe pattern might be simple solution to the issue of finding a basic set of patterns that co-ordinate, but they’re no longer available, just not economic I suppose. Some indie pattern designers have ‘pattern bundles’. I was fond of the long out-of-print 6-item Central Park pattern from Park Bench patterns, very easy to copy, either literally or in spirit.

”central-park”

Most of my posts about small groups of co-ordinating patterns refer to the work of 5 people who advise using a small capsule of key pieces as a basis for wardrobe choices : Eileen Fisher, Nancy Nix-Rice, Judith Rasband, The Vivienne Files, and Linda Lee of Sewing Workshop patterns.

Most of these posts on patterns for capsules were written around a decade ago, so many of the specific pattern suggestions are out of print. Though many of the ideas still apply. Although ‘fashion’ changes in detail every season, the basic styles which most of us wear are fairly constant.

These posts refer mainly Big 4 patterns, as they were easy to find out about at the time. Sadly those sites have changed, so most of the links in the posts do not work.
So these posts now mainly provide food for thought rather than usable links.

Eileen Fisher
here’s the 2022 version of her basics.

basic capsule.
revise the basics.
personalisation.
spring suggestions.
first part of Eileen Fisher’s holiday wear capsule, tops.
holiday wear dresses

Nancy Nix-Rice
Her set of posts referred to in my posts are no longer available. Her book has brief sections on all wardrobing topics and could be a good replacement, or she has a Craftsy class if you prefer video. She more recently emphasises that the styles in her core wardrobe diagrams are just indications, not required, such as : you need some sort of front-opening layer to wear in more serious situations, but it need not be a blazer !

NNR capsules
Some of Nancy’s capsule suggestions : 3 jackets, 4 tops, 2 skirts, 3 pants

first 8 items, there are 12 items in her core wardrobe, starting with a ‘Core 4’. The first 8 items are in dark and light core neutrals.
final 4 items, adding colour and print.
additions, the best items to add when you want more than 12. ‘Best’ defined as those items which instantly add outfits for many more situations, such as leisure if you’ve focussed your 12 on professional/ serious, or vice versa.
more comments.
accessories, no patterns.

Judith Rasband
author of college text Wardrobe Strategies for Women [terrible cover, rich content],
and the fitting bible.
While Nancy Nix-Rice uses similar shapes for the same type of garment, to make co-ordination easy, Judith Rasband deliberately makes several of the same type of garment as different as possible, to make different styles of outfit.
She has retired and her site is discontinued.

general capsule, she uses a ‘Core 5’ with 2 skirts.
summer capsule, this is 6 items with 3 tops.
variations for summer.

Vivienne Files
Janice has many bases for organising your wardrobe choices, see the Articles tab here.

wardrobe of relaxed basics [this post was written at the time of the Queen’s Diamond jubilee, in June we will be celebrating her Platinum jubilee – 70 years as Queen – amazing, good for her].
variations on relaxed wardrobe.
starting with smaller groups.

Sewing Workshop patterns
layering wardrobe.
Currently Linda Lee sews a new capsule each year, in the Sew Confident series.

other posts :
Holiday wardrobe plans, only 2 patterns suggested : classic tailored and casual wardrobe patterns.

suggestions for 3-item groups, each item claimed to be makable in less than 3 hours.

An early piece on my own minimal basics.

Fall season 2012.

More sources suggesting small groups of garments, not many pattern suggestions.

Wardrobe patterns 2012, there were more wardrobe patterns then.

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Indie pattern companies

The basic options for a casual wardrobe keep repeating. Nearly every company has patterns for a tee, tank, sweatshirt/ hoodie, cardigan, casual pants.
And the number of indie pattern companies has greatly expanded since the above posts were written (new ones daily). So there are many other sources of good casual patterns. It’s just a matter of finding ones that are right for you.

Here is a small selection of current companies mainly oriented to stylish casuals rather than activewear or dresses – my choice, other people could come up with a completely different list :

The Assembly Line.

BMann by Bridget – lagenlook.

Closet Core – famous for their jeans.

Friday Pattern Company.

Grainline Studio.

Helmersson – zero waste.

In the Folds – ‘Curated by In the Folds’ is a series of detailed written tutorials on intermediate level techniques for sewing, fitting, hacking.

Megan Nielsen.

Muna & Broad – will draft larger if you need it.

Paper Theory.

Rebecca Page.

Sew House Seven.

Sew Liberated.

Wardrobe By Me.

mainly knits :

Christine Jonson.

Pamela’s Patterns.

There are many many more indie companies. The list of companies at Pattern Review goes into the 100s. As there are also many small companies which don’t appear in the Pattern Review list, there may be as many as 150,000 patterns, more if we’re interested in vintage patterns.

No wonder we get overwhelmed !! So it’s important to have a strategy for limiting the options.
What are the basic 3-4 garment types that you absolutely have to have in your closet ?

Are there one or two pattern companies you feel especially in tune with ? For me, if I was restricted to using only patterns from one company I might choose the relaxed styles at Paper Theory or Sew House Seven, or the crisper styles at The Assembly Line if I was still working, with Birgitta Helmersson for when I’m feeling especially planet-conscious. But I’m a pattern nerd, expecting me to reduce my patterns is unrealistic 😀
Okay, if you don’t keep up with all the other pattern lines you might miss something good, but that way madness lies ! I’m on many e-mail lists, but I keep away from all the aggressive marketing on Instagram.

Which would be your favourite pattern for each of your essential garment types ?

– – –

There are two aims to finding these small groups of co-ordinating patterns :
– simplifying your wardrobe planning and co-ordination,
– providing the starting points for your pattern hacking, as summarised in the first post of this pair.

Best Wishes and Good Luck for finding and fitting your own top ranking patterns, which you can use as a starting point for hacking to add your own favourite style elements. These can be your TNTs – Tried aNd True patterns – those shapes which are key in building your personal wardrobe.

♥️ 👍 ♥️ 👍 ♥️

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One Pattern Many Looks – pattern hacking

May 22, 2022

Having recently established my own group of core essentials patterns which I can use as the base for pattern hacking, I’ve been pulling together my previous posts related to this topic into a group of 2 posts :
– pattern hacking – this post,
– choosing a small group of core patterns to use as the starting point for hacking – separate post.

Once you have a basic pattern you’re happy with, there’s an almost infinite number of changes you can make to it. With the special bonus that, if the starting pattern fits you well, the patterns you make from it are likely to fit you well too. Here are some of the many books and patterns on the subject. Follow through with any of them for a huge range of ideas.

As my body is very non-average – developing some basic patterns that fit well, and then hacking them to make new styles, works much better for me than using a different pattern for every project. So this is a topic I keep returning to. The suggestions below are the options that come first to mind, so most are in my casual top-plus-pants style.

Most of the books include patterns, but I think it’s best to use their ideas to alter your own pattern blocks. Otherwise you just keep repeating the same problem: every time you start with a new book or pattern, you have to get the patterns to fit you before you can start making your own styles.

You can of course choose your own group of basic block patterns to use in your hacking. In this blog I have often chosen a group of patterns as the base for a capsule. I have linked to those posts in a second post, though they contain little hacking guidance. Perhaps like me you just need :
– top (jacket)/pants.
Or your key choices might be :
– sheath dress/dress with waist seam/’french’ jacket, or
– tee/ cardigan/ jeans,
or any other grouping, depending on your personal style.

Once you have your base patterns, the sources linked from this post are ones that do much of the thinking for you about how to change them, they include many ideas and much guidance on both pattern making and construction.

– – –

One-pattern-many-looks books, patterns included :

full size paper patterns :
Sonya Philip, Act of Sewing, patterns for cut-on sleeve and fitted sleeve tops, a-line skirt, pants. Half the book is on simple pattern alterations.
100acts

Kwik Sew Easy Sewing, patterns for tee, camp shirt, pants, straight and flared skirts. Many alternative styles for each, with pattern changes indicated.
kwiksew

pdf patterns :
Amy Barickman Magic Pattern Book, patterns for tank top, peasant style top/dress, skirt, cardigan, coat, accessories, with patterns for 6 variations of each plus many more ideas.

draft patterns from diagrams :
Rusty Bensussen, 4 patterns – top (also used for dresses, jackets, coats), pants, a-line and circle skirts.
rusty4patts

Bordow and Rosenberg Hassle Free Make Your Own Clothes, mainly skirt, top, pants.

I don’t wear dresses and skirts, but this is one of several books about modular dress patterns – combine any bodice with any skirt : Tanya Whelan.

and there are several similar books about skirts, such as :
A-line skirts.
4 skirt silhouettes.
This is even easier – Sew What Skirts.

In the same spirit as the last skirts book, but about making simple items from fleece – Sew What Fleece.

– – –

If you prefer videos, these are some options.

A couple of DVDs by Angela Wolf at Threads :
One Pattern Many Ways One, and Two.

Many classes at Craftsy.
Many classes from Suzy Furrer on changing style elements. I do not recommend her classes on basic sloper drafting as she claims to help you draft personalised patterns, but actually uses many ‘industry standard’ measures, so the patterns are barely better fitting than any other.
I find when I have followed one of these pattern drafting methods (not just Suzy Furrer’s, any of the ‘personalised’ sloper drafting methods) I then have to do a huge amount of fitting work to get the draft to work for me, so I might as well do that on a starter pattern and skip all the drafting effort. I don’t have any problems with the geometry and maths of drafting, what does leave me spitting pins is that the supposedly well-fitting pattern I end up with after a lot of work actually has no relation to me whatever. And I’ve tried many such methods. See my fitting posts. And as you can see, whenever this topic comes up, I’m still so angry I can’t resist a rant !
But Suzy Furrer does also have many classes on how to change style elements, and you can use those ideas on your own base patterns that do fit you well.

(Much easier ways of getting core patterns that fit :
cut-on sleeve top,
sleeved top,
basic pants fit.)

There are also Craftsy classes on changes you can make starting from a basic blouse and pants patterns (patterns not included).

– – –

Pattern ranges

Fit for Art has several basic patterns with detailed instructions on how to get them to fit well. Then many add-on patterns with the specific pattern pieces for making other styles.

There is a Simplicity hacking patterns range which includes the pattern pieces you need – not as many options in this range as there used to be.

– – –

The following sources refer to master patterns which must be bought separately. You can use many of their ideas on your own pattern block, so it is not essential to start from their master pattern :

from Judy Kessinger of FitNice, who has master patterns for top and pants :
tops, dresses, pants, jackets.
tops only.

from Glenda Sparling of Sure-Fit Designs : variations of her dress, shirt, pants patterns.

Or, if you want to be more in ‘official pattern making style’, the book by Adele Margolis starts from a fitting sloper and makes it all much easier than the big college textbook tomes.

– – –

Pattern hacking can be very easy to do. Don’t be put off trying it by looking at one of the huge college pattern making textbooks.
Many ideas in this pattern hacking post, which has :
– many suggestions for simple starting points.
– links to more patterns which include hacking instructions.

And yet more ideas in these hacking posts. More books and patterns to add to those listed above :
My sewing style is one pattern many looks.
easiest pattern changes.
more simple starting points for pattern changes.
more books.

– – –

Choose and develop the fit of your own core patterns (see some ideas on the patterns to choose in the second post in this group), and look here and at the hacking posts for ideas on what to do with them !

Once you find pattern hacking is something you enjoy doing, the range of options can be overwhelming. Explore to find which part of all this fascinates you, what lifts your spirits and warms your heart 😀

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Building a wardrobe capsule

September 12, 2020

A ‘capsule’ wardrobe is a small group of co-ordinating clothes that can be mixed and matched to make different outfits.

If you only have a small number of clothes, you want to be sure they all fit the needs of your lifestyle. And that they’re all items you love to reach for in the morning – they suit your personality and make you look and feel good. Hence the whole area of ‘wardrobe planning’.

There are many on-line style advisors who suggest the items to make a capsule. For example, Leanne Blackmon at Classy yet Trendy suggests seasonal capsules in 6 different styles.
And if you like to be dazzled by capsule wardrobe ideas, there’s The Vivienne Files.
In both, the styles are mainly ‘normcore’ so it’s easy to find patterns to copy the suggestions.

These stylists have good success because some people find it daunting to make a capsule for themselves.
But actually doing-it-yourself is not difficult.

Wear what makes you feel special

It’s not difficult to choose a capsule, so long as you have some clothes that you love, that make you look good and feel good when you’re wearing them.

If you haven’t got about 20 items you feel like that about, then finding some clothes that warm your heart, lift your spirits, and make your eyes shine and your skin look healthy has much more priority than developing a capsule.

Only follow style advice that makes you feel life’s possibilities are expanding.
The important thing is not to wear any garment (or follow any style advice) that pulls you down, makes you feel lesser or uncertain, diminished or defensive.

As April Grow of Stunning Style says : “If you’re trying to talk yourself into anything you don’t genuinely love, just put it away.”

Another similar saying seen on an FB board : “In case of doubt, there is no doubt.”

An idea for the simplest possible base capsule

Anne Whalley’s approach to easy styling is to have 5 basic pieces (without any added style elements) in the same flattering neutral colour/ fabric. These are : sleeveless top, skirt, leggings, pants, dress.  Add short and long sleeve tops to increase the options.

They make a basic background column, to which you add a star layering item which has all the outfit interest.

Here’s a demo video.

She uses very simple patterns for the basics, so you could quickly sew a group of ‘good for you’ items.  In the demo the basics are in knits or stretch wovens, no reason why you can’t use non-stretch wovens if you prefer.

Many people like Pamela’s Patterns for knits.  

While Alison Glass’s fitting pattern for knits gives you tops, skirts and dresses.

Tips for building a bigger capsule

A complete ‘wardrobe’ capsule is typically about 25-30 items, which could provide you with enough different outfits for an entire season.
Some stylists insist a true capsule is smaller, see later about a travel capsule.

Go through your current clothes and pick out items that you love wearing : 7 tops, 5 pants/skirts, 5 layers, 5 shoes, 3 bags.
If you can’t find these numbers, then find one less. Or pick items that are okay – not ideal, but not ones that make you feel or look bad !

Next remove any item that cannot be worn to make a good combination (one that you are comfortable with) with at least 3 of the other items (not all at the same time!). E.g. does this skirt look good with at least 3 of the tops, at least 3 of the layers, at least 2 of the shoes, at least 1 of the bags ? If not, replace it with something else you like.

If you find combining difficult, consider simplifying :

– choose one main darker neutral, such as :
– – black or navy if your skin colouring is blue toned and your colouring is generally stronger,
– – brown and grey are more difficult to choose but more adaptable, as they can be either blue or warm toned, either light or dark.

Here’s Imogen Lamport on choosing your best neutrals.

Some colour experts say a colour is a ‘neutral’ if it’s not on the colour wheel. I think that is a limiting definition. A wider definition is that a colour is called ‘neutral’ if it’s a colour that can be worn with everything else in the capsule, so makes a good starting point for many outfits (so your starting point colour could be shocking pink if your other colours are lime green and purple 😀 ).
Another criterion for a ‘neutral’ is that you would be willing to wear pants in this colour.
And your ‘neutral’ may depend on what you are choosing your capsule for – so shocking pink for a holiday trip but not for a business one !
You’re nearly always wearing this neutral colour, so it needs to be flattering and well-loved.

– add a lighter neutral – how much lighter could relate to the natural level of contrast you have in your colouring. Many people need a softened white, if they look good in white at all. Creams for someone warm toned.

– add not more than 2 accent colours or prints.

– choose everything with the same silhouette, such as :
– – top and bottom the same width,
– – wide tops over narrow bottoms,
– – narrow tops over wide bottoms.

Imogen Lamport has written a whole range of posts on issues that may come up in choosing items for a capsule wardrobe.
Here is her advice on what to consider if the above way of simplifying things doesn’t work for you : wardrobe basics.
And here’s an interesting post from her about choosing the colours for a capsule.

Classy yet Trendy also has a guide to devising your own capsule, mainly norm core styles and not free, but covers the basics to consider (with a little guidance on getting away from black, white, and denim blue !)

But try to keep things simple. And :
Hey Presto, your first capsule 😀

Some comments

Trying to build a capsule for the first time is not something that’s instant. Make small steps and enjoy your discoveries.
No need to get an ‘ideal’ capsule from the start. It will gradually ‘improve’ as you try things out.

Of course different stylists have different criteria for what a capsule should be like. Imogen Lamport of Inside-Out Style has fewer layers (she lives in a warm climate) and insists that everything co-ordinates.

This capsule idea doesn’t work for everyone. You may be someone who needs to choose an outfit on the day, whatever feels right at the time. What felt right yesterday evening when you were planning may not feel right this morning !
But you can pre-plan outfits, take photos of them, and choose which suits your current mood. Many people find it useful to take selfies of successful combinations, so they don’t have to do much experimenting in the morning.

Even a few steps towards achieving a part capsule can be useful and interesting. A ‘learning experience’. There’s no need to rush.

As you make progress, and learn more about your favourite garment colours, shapes, styles, co-ordinates, many people find that new items fit in without having to give it much thought.
Or if they don’t, don’t buy them !

Put these items at the front of your closet, so they’re the only ones you choose from when you’re getting dressed, and see if you find the capsule idea helpful.

If you love wearing makeup or jewellery, sprinkle on your favourites for even more joy and fun 😀
You could include them in try-out sessions too.
Or would you like to add into the mix : 5 hats, 5 scarves, 5 belts, hair ornaments, gloves ?

A small travel capsule

Choose 3 tops, 2 bottoms, 2 layers, 2 shoes.
In 2 different styles, such as casual + evening out, or work + dressy evening out.
With such a small number of items, it’s best if every possible combination looks good.
Take heavier items with you by wearing them for travel.
Jewellery, scarves, make-up are small light-weight ways of adding more looks.
And if you’re away for more than a few days, what about clothes care – do you mind hand washing in a hotel room ? If you would hate that, add more light-weight non-bulky tops.

If you’d like some more help with this, here is Janice of The Vivienne Files on what to keep packed for unexpected travel.

I’ve mentioned a few capsule stylists I’ve enjoyed following. Many more come up if you do a web search.
Enjoy your discoveries 😀

first published September 2020

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Click on red header to access entire blog.

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‘Planning’ my sewing ?

March 1, 2020

I haven’t written anything here about planning for some time, but I’ve just been taking a ‘sew your own wardrobe’ class which ended with advice and examples on making written notebooks with specific plans for your wardrobe and future sewing.

And there are all those stylists and indie pattern companies which sell printed or free-gift pdf books for writing out your sewing project plans, with one page per project. They’re often not loose-leaf so you can’t even mildly change your mind. And they never have space to record what I think is important.

Oh dear, I can’t work that way at all.

One of my difficulties with sewing plans is I’m a ‘100 ideas before breakfast’ person about what I would like to make.
Also I’ve found in real life if I start on a plan, I wake up a week later to find myself doing the complete opposite (I gave up on making New Year resolutions for this reason some time ago – according to my notes here it was in 2013).

(And I was amused to hear a talk which said recent research shows if you tell people about your goals you’re less likely to reach them ! Though I don’t think that applies to written goals. It’s thought the reason is when you tell people your goals you get the same sort of enthusiastic feedback as you were looking forward to getting when you’ve achieved the goal, so that uses up some of the incentive – you can celebrate without actually doing anything 😀 )

I have managed to train myself to write my ideas down, instead of actually starting projects and then changing my mind, which began to be ridiculous –  a home full of boxes each containing a pattern and notions, and a huge fabric stash.

The point at which I realised I had to stop starting projects was when I organised all my ‘to make’ pile into project boxes, and so was face to face with the fact it was beyond helpful. . .

”project

Each of those 12 drawers is a separate project. There are also several project start-ups which are bulkier so have an individual tub.

I now have a computer full of ‘make next’ lists instead.  Each time I take a sewing or wardrobing class I end up with extensive ’make next’ lists.  My ‘make next’ list from the most recent class contains about 70 items. . .  (Meg McElwee’s Mindful Wardrobe class, thought provoking.)
And my lists change so often, I find it much easier to use word-processing rather than a paper notebook/journal to record them.  These days I find myself coming up with a new ‘make next’ list every morning  😀

I’ve also found it a great help to be secure about ‘my personal style’, so I’m not rushing after other people’s wardrobing lists and ‘develop your sewing skills’ pattern lists too !

By comparison, my actual sewing is very slow. So my focus needs to be on enjoying making, rather than on getting an ideal ‘me made’ wardrobe.

I’ve found it helps to have a good RTW wardrobe, so I’m not under pressure to make anything specific.  So I can just settle down to very slowly making items I’m fairly confident I will enjoy making and then using 😀 My making is best done in a ‘follow what I feel like doing now’ way, pre-planning and prioritising do not work for me here.

And I’m also a quilter, and enjoy using my embroidery machine. Have just fallen for yet another Block of the Month quilt, but have managed not to purchase. Unmade BoMs made another big pile in my previous home ! Long list of embroidery machine quilts I’d like to make too. . . My embroidery designs folder is also huge. There too I’m now managing to buy designs for a specific project rather than scooping up every design I like the look of. Like patterns, they’re a good low-cost option for a little treat 😀 I’ve never been a compulsive shopper for clothes, but patterns, fabric, embroidery designs all need restraint I’ve had to learn ! Now I’m making lists on my computer of what catches my eye in those categories too, instead of buying.

Well, that’s my approach to recording sewing ideas and choosing between possible projects.

But, although this sounds like the opposite of what I’ve said so far, once I start working on a specific project I do find it essential to make a detailed list of each step involved in making it, especially any step that involves changes in tools or processes.  Those lists are on my computer too.

’Sew the shoulder seams.’ Looks like a simple small step but – hmm, how many different sub-steps does that involve – pin, baste, test fit, alter, repeat, stitch, finish seams, press – and there are changes of tools used and/or position in sewing space between each step.

Also I note my progress in detailed ‘e-diaries’ rather than on paper.
So my sewing records are all on computer.

The organisers of the wardrobing course I’ve just taken are staunchly hand-written-paper-journal users. Ah well – that course has made me think I’m unconventional in an unconventional way. . .

Also ’sewing’ as the focus of my hobbies doesn’t just involve ‘making’.
What about all those very enjoyable ’sewing related’ activities which don’t get any making done : watching sewing videos, surfing pattern sites, reading sewing books, reading pattern instructions, changing patterns, blogging about sewing technique and about how to use my embroidery machine. Wandering between all those certainly is not planned. . .

There are other aspects of my life which are better sorted out on paper rather than computer.  When I was working and writing research papers, I had to integrate complex ideas and the first step was to work out how they fitted together.  I used hand drawn diagrams with many arrows to show connections. Using diagram-making software on a computer may be good for showing business plans, but I find it very much constrains creative thinking.

And when I have deadlines I do much pre-planning and prioritising. But for fun hobbies, definitely not.

So what best to do to support my sequence of activities does very much depend on specifics of the task.

Best Wishes for finding your own way through the ever-expanding maze of possibilities for sewing, planning, and making records of both.

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